July 30, 2014

pacozero:

"Lucky Lips" for i-D magazine

(via petapeta)

July 29, 2014
leiacakes:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. Weknow. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get outa pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.

CREDIT [X]  [X]

Other things not to do
Don’t EVER put me in charge of choices.Don’t ask me to make decisions.Don’t ever pressure me like that.

leiacakes:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. Weknow. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get outa pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.

CREDIT [X]  [X]

Other things not to do

Don’t EVER put me in charge of choices.
Don’t ask me to make decisions.
Don’t ever pressure me like that.

(via androids-dont-dream)

July 27, 2014
"

特徴的なのは、大人になってから、「仕事中毒になりやすい」ことだという。

 「彼らは子どもの頃から、自己不全感を持っています。セルフイメージが悪くて、劣等感を持っているんですね。自分があまり好きになれないから、仕事をしているときに充実しているんです。また、アルコール依存症になる人の約7割は、仕事中毒なんですよ。昼間、しっかり仕事をして、夜になると、飲み屋で飲んでいるんです」

"

成績優秀なのに仕事ができない “大人の発達障害”に向く仕事、向かない仕事|「引きこもり」するオトナたち|ダイヤモンド・オンライン (via otsune)

(via gkojay)

July 27, 2014
"「僕が出会った非属の人たちの多くは、自分の世界を大切にしているだけでなく、その自らの世界をエンタテイメントとして相手に提供する術を知っていた。自分のなかにある非属をみんなのためにわかりやすく翻訳したり、調理したりすることが、幸福な人生を送るためには必須なのだ。嫌われる変人はここで怠けている。どこにも属さないということは、はじめから受けいれてもらうのが困難なところにいるということであり、それなりの努力はつきものなのだ。」"

非属の才能
(via trkaction) (via gkojay)

July 27, 2014
umamoon:

h0515e:

highlandvalley:

rairaiken424:

hyousuke:

michinashi:

hkdmz:

megane4141:

uwagoto:

gkojaz:

amagiri:

samusko:

damenegi:

mocrlbmut:

sakaue:

ak47:

unknownlabel:

nemoi:

onhook:

chaosszap:

Yfrog Image : yfrog.com/4ovddmj - Uploaded by fukanao

umamoon:

h0515e:

highlandvalley:

rairaiken424:

hyousuke:

michinashi:

hkdmz:

megane4141:

uwagoto:

gkojaz:

amagiri:

samusko:

damenegi:

mocrlbmut:

sakaue:

ak47:

unknownlabel:

nemoi:

onhook:

chaosszap:

Yfrog Image : yfrog.com/4ovddmj - Uploaded by fukanao

July 27, 2014
"

振り返ること1980年代分子生物学による遺伝子クローニングが技術的に可能になった時代ハードワークで遺伝子クローニングすればCellNatureに載った時代

アメリカにわたったハードワークだけがとりえの脳なし研究者は華々しい成果をあげて凱旋帰国し、大学院重点化とあいまって次々とアカデミックポジションを獲得していった。

彼らはハードワークこそが研究だと微塵も疑わず科学倫理科学論理を考慮していない。というかその本質理解できていない。

ポスドク一万人計画によって生まれた大量の過剰ポスドク団塊ジュニア世代なので今40前後であり、脳なし教授帰国したころに学位をとってる。

なので、彼らはギリギリその上の世代のまともな教育を受けてきてる。なかには脳なしに感化されて脳なしになったのもいるが。

だが、脳なしが教授になってしまったら、その下につく准教授助教は当然脳なしハードワーカーになる。ポスドク学生も脳なしハードワーカーが好まれる。というかまともなのは淘汰されてしまう。ピペドという揶揄はこいつらのせいで生まれたとも言える。

まり現在35歳以下では、稀に存在する素晴らしい教授の下で教育を受けていないかぎり、脳筋ハードワーク病におかされておりCNS絶対教を狂信しているのだ。

そして盲目的な信仰によって病をこじらせていき、”要領”という名の不正をはじめる・・・。まじめにコツコツやっている学生ポスドクを「要領が悪い」とバッサリ切り捨てるのだ。では何をもって「要領がいい」とするのか?その答えがSTAP問題にあらわれている。

多くの人は、あの女がおかしかったんだ、と思ってるかもしれない。たしかおかしいけども、おかしいのはあの女だけじゃないんだ。

今の日本生物系は構造的に腐敗している。崩れ落ちるのを待つだけだ。

"

STAP問題は生物系における構造的腐敗の一例にすぎない (via rpm99)

(via bgnori)

July 27, 2014
highlandvalley:

Twitter / tsuta_coffee: 蔦珈琲店のトースト類にはヤクルトが付いております。皆様、「何 …

highlandvalley:

Twitter / tsuta_coffee: 蔦珈琲店のトースト類にはヤクルトが付いております。皆様、「何 …

(via plasticdreams)

July 27, 2014
"臨床の現場でのグレーゾーンというのは、たとえば以下のようなものです。

外来で診る頭痛の多くは生命の危険のないものです。頭部CTを撮影しても病変はうつりません。軽度の頭痛の患者さんが「心配だから頭部CTを撮ってほしい」と希望したとして、問診や診察によって頭蓋内病変を積極的に疑う所見がなければCTは必要ありません。コストや被曝の問題から、ホイホイとCTを撮ってはいけないということになっています。

ですが、その患者さんが、「最近、友人がくも膜下出血で倒れた。自分もそうなるのではないかと心配で心配で…」と訴えたとしたらどうでしょう。これも教科書的な対応をするならば、不安を十分に傾聴し、CTを撮る必要性が乏しいことを十分にご説明し、ご納得していただくというのが筋です。

ところがですね、はじめからCTを撮る気で来院された患者さんが、「CTは不要である」といくら説明されたところで、ご納得するとは限らんのです。そして付添いのご家族が「そうは言っても不安だから検査してもらいたい」とか言いはじめるんです。こういう場合、私はCTを撮ります。コストは不安を解消するための必要経費、被曝の問題があってもごくごく小さなことです。

これ「ホワイトゾーン」じゃないですよね。「CTを希望する患者さんに対して、CT撮影群と対照群を比較して、前者のほうが不安が解消されQOLが高かった」なんて研究はたぶんありません。かなり白いところではありますが、グレーゾーンです。少なくとも医師は、「不安解消目的にCTを撮るのは完全にホワイトじゃないよ」ということを自覚しながらCTをオーダーしなければなりません。

さらにもうちょっとだけ黒いほうに近いのは、「くも膜下出血を見落としたら訴えられるからCTを撮ろう」とか「十分に説明する時間がないから、とっととCTを撮ろう」とか、そういうケースです。これは現実的な妥協の産物です。これをダメと言い張ったら現場は回りません。しかしながら、問題意識がないのも良くありません。
"

「ニセ医学」についての本を書きました - NATROMの日記 (via rpm99)

(via rpm99)

July 27, 2014
digg:

Watch the Queen of England age through bank notes.

digg:

Watch the Queen of England age through bank notes.

(via rokuroku)

July 27, 2014
uoduk:

SHINBASHI

uoduk:

SHINBASHI

(via yellowblog)

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »